The Pittsburgh Foundation

Education Basic Needs

Since 2015, The Citizen Science Lab serves the residents of Pittsburgh’s Hill District, providing free services through partnerships with Miller African Centered Academy, Pittsburgh Milliones (UPrep), The Pitt CEC, Manchester Academy Charter School,  Urban Academy Charter School and other Hill community organizations. Students Anthony Ferguson and Jae’Ron Lee examine a lizard at the Citizen Science Lab location in the South Hills in Feb. 2022.
Since 2015, The Citizen Science Lab serves the residents of Pittsburgh’s Hill District, providing free services through partnerships with Miller African Centered Academy, Pittsburgh Milliones (UPrep), The Pitt CEC, Manchester Academy Charter School, Urban Academy Charter School and other Hill community organizations. Students Anthony Ferguson and Jae’Ron Lee examine a lizard at the Citizen Science Lab location in the South Hills in Feb. 2022.

 

Education includes student-centered activities that promote curiosity, joy and academic improvement in math, literacy, civics, history and science. It also includes the development of critical thinking, project-based learning and social capital competencies that are key to student success. Key to the development of these skills is the out-of-school time community, which serves as a bridge between learners, families and educational institutions. In Allegheny County, 67,000 students would attend an out-of-school time program if one were available. And if performance gaps based on race, ethnicity or economic status were eliminated, up to $5 billion dollars in lifetime compensation and in-kind benefits could be directed to students and their families, annually.

In our education portfolio, we are interested in supporting the following: 

Out-of-school time (OST)

The Foundation supports culturally-responsive, out-of-school time programs that promote academic achievement and whole-child development. Specifically, we seek to support: 

  • Activities that offer advanced skill development opportunities and/or certifications.
  • Tutoring and homework assistance.
  • Post-secondary planning and application support.
  • Opportunities to build relationships between schools and families.

We are particularly interested in programs that work to maximize student learning time, reduce chronic absenteeism, offer evidence-based mental health supports, serve immigrant or refugee students, students with disabilities, LGBTQIA students and students experiencing housing insecurity.

Improving education quality
 

The Foundation supports the following to ensure every child receives in-school instruction in an environment that is safe and high-quality:

  • Specific curricula improvements at high-need, low-performing schools serving marginalized students (Ex: new science, literacy, math, civics or history curricula).
  • Culturally responsive professional development for OST and school staff.
  • Efforts to eliminate systemic policies and practices that negatively impact students and their families.

NOTE: With limited resources, we find that we must create some parameters for our grantmaking. While we recognize their value, the following are not eligible for support at this time: Episodic programming, occurring less than three days per week or summer-only programs; leadership development or service-learning programs; and athletic programs, unless there is a clear case for alignment with the criteria for out-of-school time.


GRANT CYCLE APPLICATION DEADLINES
Spring grant cycle Feb. 26, 2024 by 5 p.m.
(for funding decision by June 6.)
Fall grant cycle July 11, 2024 by 5 p.m.
(for funding decision by Oct 30.)
 

Grant Guidelines   How to apply

Jamillia Kamara, program officer for education

CONTACT: 
Jamillia Kamara Covington
Senior Program Officer for Education
kamaraj [at] pghfdn.org (kamaraj[at]pghfdn[dot]org)

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Learn more about about grantmaking related to Basic Needs: